Is your address or city affecting your career search?

"They live too far away"

"That neighbourhood is full of young families"

"They're probably too suburban or not progressive thinkers"

"They'll get tired of the 1 hour commute and leave after a year"

"They probably have a big mortgage and will ask for a bigger salary"

Yes, I've heard every single one of these statements come out of a hiring manager's mouth.

It doesn't happen all the time but your address or the city you live in can affect your job search. Even if you love driving or don't mind a 1-2 hour commute, hiring managers will often project how they feel about a commute or location back on themselves and it can affect your candidacy. 

HOW TO OVERCOME LOCATION DISCRIMINATION

1. Stop putting your full address on your résumé. 
2. Instead, use the city that you're primarily applying for jobs in. 

For example, I want to work in Vancouver so on my résumé I have "Vancouver, BC" as my location. If you live in Surrey or Langley but you want to work in Vancouver (where a lot of jobs are) put Vancouver, BC on your résumé. If you're asked about where you live in an interview just be honest. I'd suggest saying something along the lines of: 

"I currently live in Surrey but most of my previous positions have been in Vancouver - and that's where I'd like to continue working - so my résumé reflects that. Would that be a concern for you?"

Remind them it's never been a problem for you and tackle it head on. If you haven't handled a commute before talk about how much work you plan to get done during the commute whether it's calls or working on your laptop or phone. Speak about it as if it's a non-issue, as if it's strange that it would even be considered a problem. 

Good luck. 

- S